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Welcome to the Berks and Scuylkill Beekeepers Association

There has been for greater awareness of the plight of honeybees and the need for the firm action, to be taken to prevent their decline. Berks and Schuylkill Beekeepers Association is working in our local area to have the same focus of the rest of the world and we are trying care for the health and sustainability of bee in our local area. The bee decline is of concern to everyone as it should be. The colony environment is vital for the survival of bees. There are many differnt factors that contribute to the health of the bees.

Berks and Schuylkill Beekeepers Association welcomes you and there is an incredible amount of information here, stay a while and learn what you can today. We welcome you back again and again. We will update the site as needed with new information and keep you up to date on any new research or documentation out there.

 

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Bee Anatomy

 

 

 

Latest news

Next Meeting of the BSBA:
We Are Meeting on 7/18 at 7pm at the Schuylkill County Extension Office.

August Meeting 8/15 Berks Checking for Mites,Treating or Not Treating (Waiting For Additional Details)

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Honey Bee

Glossary of Terms

Queen Queen: A completely developed female bee (with functioning ovaries) who lays eggs and serves as the central focus of the colony. There is only one queen in a colony of bees. A queen's productive life span is 2-3 years. If another queen is developed, one of them will sting the other to death.

Queen Workers Bees: Completely developed female bees that do have developed ovaries and do not not normally lay eggs. They gather pollen and nectar and convert the nectar to honey. A worker's life expectancy is only several weeks during the active summer months. However, they can live for many months during the relatively inactive winter period.

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